Family:Whitney, Baldwin de (s1290-1369)

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Baldwin de Whitney (Eustace, Robert, ...), son of Eustace de Whitney,[1] born say 1290,[2] died 1369.[3]

Baldwin de Whitney was a priest. He served as Dean of the College of St. Edith, Tamworth, Staffordshire from 1329 to 1369. Patron of Pencombe from at least 1343 to at least 1357; Canon of Lichfield from 1343; Prebend of Welyngton, Lichfield from 1352; Canon of Hereford from 1353; and Prebendary of Pratum Majus, Herefordshire Cathedral from 1356.

In 1329, admitted Dean of the College of St. Edith, Tamworth, Staffordshire.[4]

In 1342, the Abbot of Merevale sued Baldwin de Whiteneye, Dean of the church of Tamworth, in the Court of Common Pleas in a Warwickshire plea regarding a debt of 100s.

1343, "Mandate to make provision to Baldwin de Whyteney of a canonry of Lichfield, with expectation of a prebend, notwithstanding that he has the deanery of Tamworth and the church of Pencoumbe."[5]

On 7 Feb 1352, Westminster, "Ratification of the estate of the king's clerk Baldwin de Whyteney as prebendary of Welyngton, in the church of St. Chad, Lichefeld."[6]

1353, "Baldwin de Whytteneye, dean of Tamworth".[7]

1353, "To Baldwin de Whiteneye. Provision of a canonry of Hereford, with expectation of a prebend, notwithstanding that he has the deaconry of Tamworth, value 10 marks."[8]

In 1353 Robert de Whytene presented Baldwyn de Whytene to the church of Pencomb.[9]

In 1356, Baldwin de Whitney was Prebendary of Pratum Majus, Herefordshire Cathedral.[10]

In 1357, Baldwin de Whitney was Patron of Pencomb.[11]

In 1368, Sir Robert de Whitney was selected with 200 Knights and gentlemen to accompany the Duke of Clarence to Milan on the occasion of his marriage; Baldwin de Whitney with Richd. de Hurtesley were appointed by Royal Order to act as his agents during Sir Robert's absence in Italy.[12]

Attachments of the bailiff of the lord Baldewyn de Wyteneye of desmesne farms as appears in the estreats handed over to the bailiff 20d, 12 April 43 Edward III [1369].[13]

"Only twelve monuments and tombstones in the Church are known as going back to the time when it was collegiate, and it is a matter of historical research to find out whom each of them except one has portrayed in stone, or brass, or black outline.

In the N. wall of St. George's Chapel under a simple-pointed arch is a recumbent figure in freestone close to the floor, the head resting on a pillow, the feet on a dog, and the hands joined in prayer. The whole is much broken and decayed, and the face has been chiselled away. but the costume is that of a secular, canon, which consisted of a cassock, a surplice, and the alumtium or tippet with long lappets in front and a hood here drawn over the head. Is not this the tomb of Baldwin de Whitney, Dean of Tamworth who died in 1369? It seems to be. For this monument of a dignitary of a chapter is coeval with the Chapel built here first after the Church was burnt down in 1345. Now this Baldwin was the only Dean between that year and 1400 who died possessed of his benefice at Tamworth. As a friend of Sir Baldwin de Frevile he appears in some Castle deeds, so that he must have dwelt here. And at that period none of the Canons were in residence who died still holding their Prebends in this Church. Hence this lowly monument may be looked on with a deep and double interest, not only as showing the dress of the Canons here, but also as the memorial of the Dean who was probably the founder of this Chapel, and under whose charge the Church was built again on a scale and in a style remarkable alike for excellence and beauty.

Thomas de Whitney was presented by Baldwin de Frevile, and was instituted Sept. 3rd 1342. But this right to take the turn falling by the composition of 1334 to Ralph le Botiller the minor was challenged by the king, who claimed the gift on account of the wardship and issued a write of Quare impedit against the Lord of the Castle. The arguments on the question were long, learned, and full of law, so as to form afterwards a standing precedent in cases of the same kind. The upshot of the matter was that the right of the crown was established." [14]

Children of Baldwin de Whitney, if any, unknown.

Notes

Although these references to Baldwin de Whitney probably refer to the same individual, this is by no means certain.

"North chapel has tomb recess with effigy of priest, Baldwin de Witney, d.1369" - Details for IoE Number: 386462, Church of St. Editha, Tamworth, Staffordshire.

See The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, St Editha, Tamworth, Staffordshire for more information.

References

1.^  Although no record has been found to conclusively link Baldwin de Whitney as the son of Eustace de Whitney, he almost certainly belongs here. One of the co-heirs to St Edith College in Tamworth was Alexander de Freville. This Alexander was the father of the wife of Eustace's son and heir Eustace de Whitney (c1287-c1352), proving a familial connection to this location.

The following source appears to substantiate this connection, and needs to be investigated further: "Dean of Tamworth, of lay patronage, 10 marks, not a dignity or parsonage, but a simple benefice ... Baldwin. Whitney was a son of sir Eustace Whitney, kt., ...", - Architectural and Archaeological Society of the County of Lincoln, Northamptonshire Architectural and Archaeological Society, Yorkshire Architectural and York Archaeological Society, Worcestershire Archaeological Society, Leicestershire Archaeological Society, and Associated Architectural Societies, Reports and Papers of the Architectural and Archaeological Societies of the Counties of Lincoln and Northampton (1850), p. 24, as found on Google Books preview.

2.^  Supposition.

3.^  'Colleges: Tamworth, St Edith', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3 (1970), pp. 309-315, citing B/A/1/2, f. 144; S.H.C. N.S. x(2), 126.

4.^  'Colleges: Tamworth, St Edith', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3 (1970), pp. 309-315, citing B/A/1/2, f. 144; S.H.C. N.S. x(2), 126.

5.^  W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson, eds., Calendar of Entries in the Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Papal Letters, Vol. III A.D. 1342-1362, (Eyre and Spottiswoode: London, 1897), p. 99.

6.^  Great Britain Public Record Office, Calendar of the Patent Rolls Preserved in the Public Record Office. Prepared under the Superintendence of The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Edward III Vol. IX. A D. 1350-1354, (London: Mackie and Co., LD, 1907), p. 219.

7.^  W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson, eds., Calendar of Entries in the Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Papal Letters, Vol. III A.D. 1342-1362, (Eyre and Spottiswoode: London, 1897), p. 494.

8.^  W. H. Bliss and C. Johnson, eds., Calendar of Entries in the Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Papal Letters, Vol. III A.D. 1342-1362, (Eyre and Spottiswoode: London, 1897), p. 498.

9.^  Henry Austin Whitney, The First Known Use of Whitney as a Surname: Its Probable Signification, and Other Data (Boston, MA: Henry Austin Whitney, 1875), p. ix.

10.^  Rev. Francis Tebbs Havergal, Fasti Herefordensis (1869), page 82

11.^  Henry Austin Whitney, The First Known Use of Whitney as a Surname: Its Probable Signification, and Other Data (Boston, MA: Henry Austin Whitney, 1875), p. ix.

12.^  Morgan George Watkins, Collections towards the history and antiquities of the county of Hereford. In continuation of Duncumb’s history. Hundred of Huntington ... (Hereford: 1898), pp. 77-95.

13.^  Pencombe Manor Documents

14.^  The History and antiquities of the collegiate church of Tamworth, Charles Ferrers and Raymund Palmer, 1871 Oxford University], pp. 85 and 109.


Copyright © 2008, Tim Doyle and the Whitney Research Group.

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